Expansion Draft


The rules for each expansion draft were different. The relevant details are as follows.

1960 American League

Each existing AL club had to make available seven players who were on their active roster at August 31, 1960, and eight others from their forty man roster. The Angels and Senators paid $75,000 for each of 28 players they drafted- seven from each existing club. They were required to take at least ten pitchers, two catchers, six infielders, and four outfielders. Also, they had the option of drafting one Rule 5 draft-eligible player for $25,000 from each established franchise.  Players were selected by position, with pitchers taken first, and the two teams flipped for first pick for each position.

1961 National League

The rules were similar to those used by the American League the prior year. However, after two players were drafted from each existing NL club at $75,000 each and one more at $50,000, the existing clubs had to make two more players available at $125,000 apiece. The Mets and Astros were not required to draft those extra players; they were only mandated to take between 20 and 28 players.

After two years, due to the expansion clubs' lack of competitiveness, they were allowed to draft an additional player. They had a choice of four from each of the older clubs' 40 man rosters, paying $30,000 apiece. Only eight players in total could be taken between the two.

1968 American League

Each established club was allowed to protect fifteen players on its 40 man roster prior to the first round. After each round, those clubs could protect an additional three players. The draft lasted six rounds, each round consisting of five picks for each expansion club, with each established club losing one player per round. The newcomers chose thirty players each at a price of $175,000 apiece. Seattle had the first pick while Kansas City got the next two. All unprotected major and minor leaguers except for first year professionals could be chosen.

1968 National League

The rules were basically the same as in the AL. San Diego had the first choice in the first, fourth and sixth rounds, with Montreal picking first in the other three. Each expansion team paid $10 million for its franchise and players.

1976 American League

The draft rules this time around were the same as the AL used in 1968 except that after the fourth round, the established clubs could protect an additional two players only.  Players whose professional careers had begun in 1976 were not eligible, and veterans with no-trade rights could be taken only with their consent.

1992 National League

For the first time, players from both leagues were available to the expansion clubs. The draft consisted of three rounds. For the first round, each existing club could protect fifteen players, and only one player could be drafted from each. Then the NL clubs could protect three additional players and the AL clubs four. The same held true for the third round, but only eight AL clubs could lose a player in that round. All unprotected Major and minor League players were eligible except those chosen in the amateur drafts of 1991 or 1992 and players who were 18 or younger when signed in 1990.
  
1997

For the first round, each existing club could protect fifteen players, and only one player could be drafted from each. Then they could protect three additional players. The same held true for the third round, but only seven clubs in each league could lose a player in that round.  Thus each expansion team could chose 35 players.  All unprotected Major and minor League players were eligible except those chosen in the amateur drafts of 1996 or 1997 and players who were 18 or younger when drafted in 1995.

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